WILLIAM E. BROWN

AND

BARBARA GRIES

AND

INCLUDING BARBARA'S PARENTS

 

William Brown b 1854
Barbara Gries b 1857
Otto b 1878
Emily b&d 18-79
Henry b 1882
Harvey b 1884
Ida May b 1886
Alfred b 1888
Florence b 1891
Esther b 1893
Willis b 1899
   
WILLIAM E. BROWN AND BARBARA GRIES BROWN

     THE ONLY REMEMBRANCE I HAVE OF W. E. IS WHEN HE WAS LYING "IN STATE" AT BARBARA'S HOUSE. I WAS ONLY 31/2 YEARS OLD, BUT I REMEMBER SOMEONE LIFTING ME UP TO SEE HIS FACE. HIS CASKET WAS PLACED IN THE BIG BAY WINDOW.
   I DO REMEMBER BARBARA A LITTLE BIT. I REMEMBER THE HUGE COOKIES SHE MADE US; AND SHE WOULD MAKE DOUGHNUTS FROM LEFTOVER BREAD DOUGH. THEY WERE ALSO BIG AND LOADED WITH BUTTER AND SUGAR. THEY WERE PROBABLY NOT AS BIG AS I WAS SMALL.
     SHE WOULD MAKE THEM AT OUR HOUSE, AND THEY WERE FRESH AND WARM WHEN I GOT HOME FROM SCHOOL. SHE WAS ALWAYS CAREFUL TO SEE THAT EACH CHILD GOT ONE. IF THE BOYS GOT THERE FIRST, I COULD HAVE BEEN LEFT OUT.
     THE OLDER KIDS TELL OF HER MEETING THEM AT THE END OF HER DRIVEWAY WITH HER LONG WHITE APRON FLAPPING, CARRYING HUGE, THICK SLICES OF HOMEMADE BREAD WITH BUTTER AND SUGAR ON THEM. HUNGRY KIDS DON'T FORGET THAT!
     MAMA SAID SHE WOULD OFTEN COME TO OUR PLACE AND HELP WITH DINNER FOR HARVEST MEN, AND SHE WOULD COME AT LAUNDRY TIME TO COOK WHILE MAMA WASHED ON THE WASHBOARD. MAMA LOVED HER COMPANY, AND GRANDMA LOVED MAMA-AND HERE KIDS.
     AS FOR MY AUNTS AND UNCLES ON THE BROWN SIDE, THEY WERE A DELIGHT! THEY WERE STRONG, FUNNY, HELPFUL, AND VISITED THE FARM A LOT. THEY BROUGHT GOOD FOOD AND PIES.
     THEY HELD US YOUNGER ONES ON THEM LAPS, KIDDED US, LOVED US, AND GAVE US GOOD MEMORIES. WE HAD A PICNIC AREA DOWN ON THE CREEK. THEY WOULD TAKE FOOD AND UTENSILS DOWN THERE, MAKE A HUGE BONFIRE, AND THE WOMEN WADED IN THE CREEK, GOT THE FOOD READY AND WATCHED THE KIDS. THAT WAS A CHORE IN ITSELF AS WE WERE ALL YOUNG, HAPPY AND ADVENTURESOME.
     THE MEN WOULD STRIP TO THE WAIST, GO INTO THE CREEK AND SEINE FOR FISH. AFTER THE FISH WERE , COOKED, WE HAD A BIG DINNER (SOMETIMES FROM THE FOOD THE WOMEN BROUGHT. HA) BUT SOMETIMES THEY FOUND CATFISH UNDER ROCKS, AND HELPED WITH THE MENU.
     ONE THING I REMEMBER ABOUT A PICNIC: IT WAS FALL, AND THE HORSEWEEDS WERE VERY THICK IN SIZE. WE USED THEM FOR SWORDS, BUT CAUGHT THEM ON FIRE TO MAKE IT MORE GRUESOME. I SOMEHOW GOT ONE TOO CLOSE, IT BURNED MY NECK AND IT HURT. I ENJOYED THE ATTENTION I GOT; WE WENT TO THE HOUSE, AND I GOT RUBBED WITH  UNGUNTINE, I STILL HAVE A SCAR.
     I STAYED IN TOWN WITH OTTO AND HIS SECOND WIFE, VALERIA, FOR A WHILE WHEN MARY LOU HAD SCARLET FEVER. SHE MADE ME WEAR LONG, COTTON HOSE AND PUT MY HAIR UP IN RAGS TO MAKE IT CURLY. UGH!! I ALSO ROLLED CIGARETTES FROM PAPERS AND LOOSE TOBACCO FOR UNCLE OTTO. HE AND HIS FIRST WIFE LOST A BABY AT BIRTH, AND THEY BURIED IT UNDER A CEDAR TREE IN THE PASTURE, UP A LITTLE GRADE FROM W. E.'S HOUSE. I LOOKED AT THAT TREE A LOT, AND NOW IT IS GONE, TOO.
     UNCLE HENRY ASKED THE FAMILY TO COME TO HIS HOUSE AND "HEAR" THE JOE LOUIS -  SCHMELLING FIGHT ON THE RADIO. ELECTRICITY HAD NOT COME OUT THAT FAR YET. AUNT MAY SERVED US ICE CREAM. I ENJOYED GOING BACK TO HIS FARM DURING OUR REUNION IN 1993, SEEING ALL THE BUILDINGS, BARN, ETC., JUST BEFORE THEY TORE IT ALL DOWN. THE ALF BROWN PLACE WAS GONE, TOO.
     FLORENCE AND HER DAUGHTER, DOROTHEA CAME, AND DOROTHEA PLAYED RAGTIME ON THE OLD PIANO. SO FUN!
     AUNT ESTHER WAS A FAVORITE. SHE LOANED ME DRESSES FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS, LET ME BATHE IN HER INSIDE BATHTUB, AND I THOUGHT HER HOUSE WAS BEAUTIFUL, BIG AND HAD LOVELY FURNITURE. SITTING IN HER TINY, AIRY KITCHENETTE, EATING A SNACK, WAS LIKE ENJOYING A TIME IN FAIRYLAND.      

     AUNT IDA AND UNCLE ERNIE WERE A RIOT! SHE AND MOM WOULD GO FISHING IN OLD OVERALLS, SIT ON UPTURNED 5 GALLON BUCKETS ON A MUDDY CREEK BANK; THEY LAUGHED, TALKED AND COMPLAINED ABOUT THEIR HUSBANDS. OCCASIONALLY THEY WOULD CATCH A FISH.
     I REALLY HATED TO SEE THEM PASS ON, BUT WE STILL HAVE SOME COUSINS. I DON'T SEE THEM AS OFTEN AS I WOULD LIKE. DISTANCE IS A PROBLEM, AND WE ARE ALL OLDER NOW. MAYBE THIS WEB SITE WILL REFRESH MEMORIES. THAT IS WHAT IT IS FOR. I HOPE YOU ENJOY THE FEW THINGS I REMEMBER. THANKS, EMORY!! LOVE, BOBBIE

 
Barbara Brown William E. Brown
 
Descantants of William E. and Barbara Brown
 
Florence,       Esther,       Alf,       Henry,       Otto,       Ida    
Barbara Gries Brown,   Willie,    W. E. Brown
 
 
Grandma Brown 1924
 
William E. Brown  5a
 
7
WILLIAM E. BROWN.
 

     William E. Brown, who is one of the most influential of the farmers of Cowley County, Kansas, owns 1,400 acres of the finest land in the Grouse Valley, in addition to extensive pasture lands elsewhere. His farm is under a high state of cultivation, is all well fenced and in excellent condition, and his elegant home is acknowledged to be the finest in his section. Mr. Brown was born in Sandusky County, Ohio, October 28, 1854, and is a son of Valentine and Anna M. (Lawyer) Brown.
     Valentine Brown was born in Bavaria, Germany, in 1830 (the name having been, originally, spelled Braun), and came to this country at the age of nineteen years. He was a farmer by occupation, for many years, and later became an Evangelical minister. He died in September 1894. He had served several terms as justice of the peace. His wife was born in Baden, Germany, November 11, 1828, and still resides in Sandusky County, Ohio. She came to this country at an early age and was united in marriage with Mr. Brown at Buffalo, New York. They became the parents of four children, two of whom died in infancy. Those living are William E. and Emma (Barnhope), who is living on the old homestead in Ohio. William E. has four cousins living in this country, but the remainder of his relatives are in Germany.
     William E. Brown received his education training in the public schools of Ohio, and in the normal school in Seneca county, Ohio. He first, worked upon the farm and remained at home after reaching his majority. He was never far from his home until after his removal to Kansas, in July 1884. He located in Windsor township, Cowley county, and purchased the farm in section 21, township 31, range 7 east, which was first preempted by John Tull, and by him sold to Mr. James, of whom Mr. Brown purchased it. He brought with him some fine thoroughbred stock, including Hereford cattle and Poland China stock, He built a large new barn, and resided on the property with his family, until July, 1900, when he bought the S. M. Fall property one of the best improved farms in the county. It comprises 560 acres, which with the 840 acres he had previously acquired, makes a farm of 1,400 acres, lying in the Grouse Valley. Of the 840 acres mentioned, 300 acres were obtained of Mr. James; 120 acres - part of the old Wilkins place - from D. L. Snowden; and 240 acres, from the Clover estate. In addition to this he owns 600 acres below Cambridge, which he purchased of Thomas Eaton, and 1,200 acres in the Flint Hills, to which various parties have held title to which was acquired by Mr. Brown through loan companies. He handles stock largely, and has about 300 head of horses and cattle. He has 300 acres fenced, hog-tight, on the home farm, this having been done by the former owner. The buildings are of comfortable size, well built and of good appearance, and show to good advantage from the road, as they are located upon a rise of ground. The beautiful home is surrounded by well kept grounds, with a good drive leading up to it from the road, and the fencing is largely of stone. Mr. Brown has a basement barn, 34 by 50 feet, in dimensions, and well arranged. He has 20 acres in "fruit on his two farms, on one of which resides one of his sons. He has 120 acres planted in alfalfa, and has been very successful in its culture. The farm is drained by Grouse Creek, and the water supply is furnished by wells, from 12 to 16 feet deep.
     Mr. Brown was united in wedlock with Barbara Gries, in Ohio. She was born in September 1856, in Erie County, New York, and is a daughter of George and Barbara (Mitzel) Gries. She was one of six children, namely: George, who resides in Wood county, Ohio; Barbara; Libbie (Roush), of Michigan; Andrew, who lives in Sandusky county, Ohio; and Edward and Jacob, twins, whose home is in Ohio. Her parents moved to Ohio when she was nine years of age, and, both are still living. Mr. and Mrs. Brown became the parents of 10 children, as follows: George Valentine; William Otto; Amelia; Henry E.; Harvey A.; Ida May; Alfred; R.; Florence F.; Bessie Esther, and Willis V. George Valentine died at the age of two years. William Otto is in partnership with his father, and resides upon the latter's original Cowley County farm; he married Emma Hartle, a daughter of Samuel Hartle, Jr., of Delaware County, Indiana. Amelia died at the age of two, Ida May is fourteen years old. In politics, Mr. Brown is a Populist, and has served as township trustee and clerk. Fraternally, he is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows lodge at Burden; the Ancient Order of United Workmen lodge at Cambridge (of which his son, Henry E. is also a member); and the Modern Woodmen of America, to which order his son, William Otto, also belongs. Religiously, Mr. Brown is a member of the Evangelical Association, and attends church at Cambridge. His portrait accompanies this sketch.

 

8

Business Card:  W. E. Brown & Sons,  Cambridge, Ks

 
9
Wm. Brown   Smokehouse  
 

10

"Weanin" House converted to a Garage.

 

Cave or Celler under Wm. Brown "Weanin House"  11

 

12

Wm. Was a very proud man. He cared for his family and also his Farmstead,

 including his animals, pens and barns.

They moved here In about 1910, and this picture was taken about 1912 or so.

In the picture, back row: Wm, (unknown) Henry, May, Grandma, Otto And

then my mother and dad,  Annabelle and Alf.

Front row: Willis, Florence, Esther, Ida and Emma.

   

13

W. E., Alf, Emma, ?, Ida, Florence, Henry, Esther, May, Willie, Barbara, Otto, Annabelle

 
14
Harvey, Otto, Henry, Alfred, Ida Brown about 1893
 
15
 
 
 
 
 

Ida May Brown,  Willis Brown

 

 
 
18
William and Barbara Brown baby William Otto  1875   Fremont, Ohio
 
 

 

Otto Brown and Emma Hartel on their wedding day.
 
Floyd Brown
 
Otto Brown and Valeria
 
Floyd Brown and mother Emma Hartel
 
Otto Brown in California
 
Barbara Brown Ledgerwood, Henry Brown, and Marylou Brown Ashcraft
 

Henry Brown, May Givler Brown, Bill Harlan, and Esther Bessie Harlan

 

Cambridge was a big shipping center for cattle, hogs, and other livestock. It was busy all year.
 It had a loading ramp, many pens, and was located adjacent to the RR tracks.
The object in the foreground was a city well.
Those who didn't have dug wells, got their water here.
There was no water or sewer system until about 1940. Outside 3-holers were the norm.
Looks like a light at the well - probably a gas light. Picture was taken in 1912
 
THE STORY AS I HEARD IT: W. E. JUST WOULDN'T GIVE UP HIS EYE FOR THE LADIES,
SO BARBARA LEFT HlM AND MADE HlM BUILD HER THIS HOUSE 2 MILES NORTH OF
CAMBRIDGE. PLUS, SHE DEMANDED AND GOT A LARGE ACREAGE OF GRASSLAND EAST
OF THE HOUSE.
WILLIAM WENT TO CALIFORNIA, BOUGHT AN ORCHARD, LOST ALL HIS INVESTMENT,
THEN CAME BACK TO KANSAS, LIVED AND DIED IN WICHITA, AND WAS BURIED IN THE CAMBRIDGE CEMETERY.
ESTHER AND BILL HARLAN LIVED WITH BARBARA UNTIL SHE DIED.
THE HARLANS MOVED BACK TO CAMBRIDGE, BUT PHYLLIS HARLAN SAYS SHE "CRIED
ALL THE WAY TO TOWN WHEN THEY LEFT TO GO BACK TO TOWN."